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Eat Your Yard Jax

Kale Boucher I’ve long romanticized gardening. As soon as I got my hands on “The Adventures of Peter Rabbit” I was fixated by the idea of growing your own food. It’s only recently I’ve made the leap from childhood dreaming to tangible learning and practice. In this, I’m not alone. The concept of Urban Agriculture, or gardening in city spaces, has exploded in popularity in recent years. Urban Farming is not a new idea; there’s evidence of urban growing as far back as 3,500 BC Mesopotamia. However, it’s current resurgence is due in large part to the desire for more …

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Leprechaun: Good or Bad?

Every year around the globe people celebrate St. Patrick’s Day on March 17th as what many consider a cultural and/or religious celebration to honor the feast day of St. Patrick – the patron saint of Ireland. What was once celebrated with feasts and religious services is now considered a day full of festivities, like drinking Irish beer and wearing green, for those who immigrated from Ireland bringing the Irish holiday with them. So, this day is spent honoring saints and drinking beer, but who came up with the idea of little green men hoarding pots of gold? According to Irish …

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Women in Photography

By Lily Snowden For centuries, women have been oppressed. Not only as people, but also as artists. Think about it: The Mona Lisa? Painted by a man. The Starry Night? Painted by a Man. The Kiss? I think you get the point. It seems for centuries women could be the subjects of art, but could never be the creators of it. Many only consider art as paintings, drawings, or sculptures, and one artform people most often overlook is photography. The fact of the matter is photography has almost always been dominated by men. The first photo was taken by a …

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Take a Walking Tour of “America’s Oldest… Celtic City” St. Augustine !

  by Albert Syeles, President of Romanza  Every March “Spanish” St. Augustine, Florida, USA, celebrates its Celtic roots with “The WORLD’s Original St. Patrick Parade”, the “St. Augustine Highland Games”, the internationally recognized “St. Augustine Celtic Music and Heritage Festival” and something NEW: “Celtic NOIR! Authors Symposium”.  St. Augustine’s has an amazing Celtic history, including Colonial Governors and historic vicars of Celtic descent, stories of romance and mystery, and most extraordinarily: St. Augustine was founded by Celts! St. Augustine’s history used to be thought-of as primarily Spanish. Even the significant British Colonial period here, which spans the American Revolution, only …

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Artists and educators Lance Vickery and Jenny Hager inspire aspiring artist and the community in general with their prolific public art

Jay Mafela Part of what makes Jacksonville so great is all the kinds of art one can find just by walking around. Some of the most memorable examples are giant sculptures by Lance Vickery and Jenny Hager. They have over 80 pieces of art in places from the Cummer Museum to the Jacksonville Zoo to Downtown. The two work as art professors at the University of North Florida. Hager is a professor of sculpture, while Vickery is an assistant professor in the same program. In addition to art  courses, Hager teaches a business in art class where young artists learn …

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Jax transplants take a grassroots approach to promoting local artists with Neighborhood Jams

Lily Snowden  There is no doubt that Jacksonville has a large local music scene. However, most of these bands have found it impossible to find their “big break” or even a stage to play on that isn’t in the living room of a house show. Challenges related to the pandemic and the high cost of equipment have discouraged many bands from performing recently, as well. Fortunately, two Jacksonville-based promoters, who also happen to be twins, are working to help local musicians and artists get the exposure they desperately need.  Originally from New Smyrna Beach, a town with an almost non-existent …

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Judging Michael

Susan Clark Armstrong Some folks think that the process to select judges is rooted in virtue so pure that attorneys with the wisdom of Solomon are somehow plucked from courtrooms, law offices or behind careening ambulances to impartially serve justness to the wrong and the wronged. They believe selection committees, canons, government agencies, state bar associations and the voters ensure that a wise and appropriate person is selected. Sometimes, the safeguards don’t work, but more often they do.  And, as in all professions, there are heroes. It’s those in the courtrooms who keep the peace, administer oaths, record the course …

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Weird Wild Stuff #2 Humans, and Other Animals

This month’s installment was written days before the actual deadline, because this first story is so stupid that I had to just jump in, immediately. To wit: In early January, the LAPD announced a phenomenon most rare: Two police officers were actually fired for official misconduct. Such harsh penalties are usually reserved for people who openly collaborate with gangs, steal drugs from the evidence locker or break sea turtle eggs–you know, the worst of the worst. In this case, their crime was more one of omission, as they failed to go deal with a reported robbery because—don’t even bother guessing—they …

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