Outdoors

Living Your Dream, on a Yacht

Lily Snowden Imagine waking up on a yacht every day, perhaps in the Bahamas, Mediterranean or Virgin Islands. Sounds like a dream, right? For many young 20-somethings, this is a reality. But how?! One word: yachting. Though many people don’t realize it, the yachting industry has a high demand for workers. With a low cost of living, extended travel dates and other perks, this career has quickly picked up popularity among young Floridians and adventurers alike. Known as “yachties,” they are paid to live what many would consider a dream life: Work on a yacht, travel for free and use …

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The Garden Club of Jax

Lily Snowden The Garden Club of Jacksonville turned 100 years old on March 25, 2022. The Garden Club of Jacksonville is one of Florida’s oldest and most established garden clubs. Ninah May Holden Cummer founded the club on March 25, 1922 in her home in Riverside. The club was originally comprised of 17 of Cummer’s friends. Within months, the club grew to over 100 members. The Garden Club of Jacksonville was one of the original four clubs in the Florida Federation of Garden Clubs. The club continued to grow over the years, and eventually broke ground on a clubhouse. The …

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Poe Pinson Profile

How long have you been skating for? About 13 years. That’s like you learn to walk and push at the same time. Have you been competing the whole time, too? Oh, not really the whole time. My first bigger contest was in 2014/2015 at Exposure in Encinitas, California. That was pretty sick. I was nine or 10. And I got first place in the under 14. It was an all girls contest so it had a super cool vibe. How did you get involved with X-Games stuff? The first Olympic qualifier was a Dew Tour event in 2019. And that …

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1,100 Miles the Hard Way

I was recently introduced to the Japanese ritual of Misogi, a Shinto ceremony where people take pilgrimage as a purification ritual, to natural, sacred locales like the waterfalls of Mount Ontake and oceans. This is believed to cleanse impurities and to re-establish harmonious relationships with both themselves and the natural world around them, ultimately balancing one’s life internally and externally.  Learning about this religious ceremony made me realize the idea of pilgrimage-for-purification is quite prevalent in western culture, or example, through-hikers on the Appalachian Trail, but how rare it is for people to personalize their “pilgrimage” to one’s own need …

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In This Climate?! Developing Dunes? Na. Erasing Culture? Na.

Joseph Guiffre It is a rare thing when the opportunity for environmental conservation, cultural protection, and historical preservation meet in one place. On the uniquely untouched southern end of Amelia Island there exists just such a spot. Among the wind whipped sand and in the embrace of the dense trees of a maritime hammock, lies the crossroads of some of the most prominent names in American and Floridian history; American Beach. The center of American Beach is towered over by Big NaNa dune and Little NaNa dune; a system of sand and plants that together make up the tallest sand …

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Foar From Home

Paddling a rowboat across the Atlantic Ocean might seem like an impossible task to some, but to Billy Cimino, Paul Lore, Cam Hansen and A.M. “Hupp” Huppman (aka team Foar From Home), it’s the perfect vehicle to bring awareness to their message: 22 military veterans die by suicide every day, and resources need to be more accessible to those struggling with PTSD and other mental health issues. The Talisker Whiskey Atlantic Challenge is a 3,000 mile race wherein 30-40 teams or solo racers paddle unsupported from La Gomera in the Canary Islands to Antigua in the Caribbean. The world record …

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Shrimpin’ Ain’t Esay

            Let me start off by telling you how much shrimp I eat: A LOT, but it wasn’t until a international journalism course with Professor Nicolas Tatro that I really began to question the source of my seafood and the importance of sourcing seafood locally. Shrimping has been a vital aspect of Northeast Florida’s commerce since the early 1900s when Greek boat builders Michael Tiliakos and Demetrios Deonas moved to Fernandina Beach. Using larger engined boats with the ability to trawl larger nets, they helped establish Fernandina as the birthplace of the modern shrimping industry. By …

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JACKSONVILLE ZOO AND GARDENS ASKS FOR HELP TO RAISE $250,000 BY SUNDAY 

When COVID-19 forced Jacksonville Zoo and Gardens to close its gates for two months, the nonprofit lost critical revenue during its busiest months. The Zoo is now asking for the community’s help to recover through the ZOO-A-THON, which aims to raise $250,000 in donations by Sunday. “Many people are surprised to learn how expensive it is to maintain our day-to-day operations, even after we closed to the public on March 14. We still had to feed and care for our animals daily, as well as employ the dedicated staff who worked through our closure. We were closed during our busiest …

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Jacksonville, Florida is a Hidden Gem to Live and Play

Jacksonville, Florida is the Hidden Gem of Florida

Jacksonville, Florida, is emerging as a rising travel destination. But what about a destination to live in? The locals have always known that Jacksonville, or Jax as we like to call it, is one of Florida’s little gems. Now others are slowly discovering that Jacksonville is a pretty cool place to live.  Here are 6 things about Jacksonville, Florida that many people overlook, making it one of Florida’s most underrated cities. 1.  Plenty of Outdoor Activities Jacksonville boasts the largest land area of any city in the United States spreading across more than 840 miles. The St. Johns River runs through …

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