History

Father’s Day

Every year we take time to remind our fathers and/or father figures why we love and appreciate them. Whether we give them a funky gift or spend the day with them, we want to thank them for all they do, just as we do every Mother’s Day for our wonderful mothers and mother figures. In this day and age everyone has their own definition of father and father figure, but why do we celebrate it on a single day in the month of June? What is the story behind Father’s Day? The first known celebration honoring fathers was July 5, …

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The Rich History of the Ritz

Jay Mafela Located in LaVilla, the Ritz Theatre and Museum is not only a gorgeous venue for concerts and theatrical productions but also serves as a tribute to the lives and contributions of local African-Americans. The Ritz stands on the same spot as the movie theater of the same name built in 1929. At the time, LaVilla was considered by many to be the “Harlem of the South,” attracting performers including Louis Armstrong, Duke Ellington, Ella Fitzgerald, Billie Holiday and a young Ray Charles. The original building was eventually torn down with the new Ritz opening in 1999. Today, it …

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It’s A Bird, It’s A Fish, It’s A Square Grouper

Lily Snowden It’s always exciting to hear of large blocks of drugs washing up on the coast of Florida and wondering where the pirates or fugitives are that let the product slip away. What is often not thought about, however, is how or why the bale was let go or how it got there. What normal, non-drug smuggling people do not think about is the logistics from a drug dealer’s point of view. “If I drop this package from the air at this coordinate, the boat three nautical miles away will be able to pick it up due to the …

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Take It from the Mathews Bridge

Finally, Jacksonville to replace Andrew Jackson statue with a lot of Nu-Metal.  By: Glenn Michael Van Dyke As Floridians, we’re all used to the long, straight, and unchanging drive from Jacksonville to Miami, from hot to hotter, an apt metaphor for Florida’s place among our current political climate. The terrain is all too familiar. It would be “very Florida” to simply crack a beer and watch the scene unfold. But that doesn’t really seem to be working in our favor.  For anyone who believes in progress, it’s easy to feel as though we’re held hostage on this here penisula. A …

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Oh, the things you’ll learn!

Dr. Seuss is called many things. An artist, an inspiration, a motivator, but a racist? This was never the narrative until recently. With his childlike rhymes and colorful art, it seems that Dr. Seuss, too, has a colorful past. Before his famous tales, Dr. Seuss was the chief editorial and political cartoonist for the New York newspaper, PM, from 1941 to 1943. There he drew over 400 editorial cartoons highlighting political history. In many of these drawings, Seuss depicted Japanese, Arabs, and Africans in offensive and exaggerated ways. Even though Dr. Seuss’s aesthetic is interpreted as unusual and funny, many …

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In This Climate?! Developing Dunes? Na. Erasing Culture? Na.

Joseph Guiffre It is a rare thing when the opportunity for environmental conservation, cultural protection, and historical preservation meet in one place. On the uniquely untouched southern end of Amelia Island there exists just such a spot. Among the wind whipped sand and in the embrace of the dense trees of a maritime hammock, lies the crossroads of some of the most prominent names in American and Floridian history; American Beach. The center of American Beach is towered over by Big NaNa dune and Little NaNa dune; a system of sand and plants that together make up the tallest sand …

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Remembering Bob Marley

Rain Henderson Bob Marley is one of the most well-known names in music history and has been covered by artists of all genres: Eric Clapton, Johnny Cash, Sublime, Screamin’ Jay Hawkins, Nina Simone and many others. If you don’t know much about Marley, you’re sure to have seen his face printed on shirts at almost any crappy head shop or heard his most popular songs setting the vibe at some tiki-inspired bar you sipped a piña colada at. Sadly, capitalism has exploited Marley and turned him and his music into a vacation theme song and a  “yeah, I smoke herb” …

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Haunted House Guide

Think you’re too tough for haunted houses? Think again. These houses are not for the faint of heart.  Halloween is my favorite time of year. I was born the day before Halloween, so it’s always held a special place in my heart. This year, I decided to get into the spirit early and visit two of the scariest and most entertaining haunted attractions in the region. I don’t frighten easily, but I will be completely transparent about the fact I left these houses dripping in sweat. Does fear makes you perspire or am I just a sweaty Italian man?  13th …

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Black History Matters: Mural Project Brings Awareness to Jacksonville’s Historic Eastside

HOPE & HISTORY MURAL

This article was originally published April 5, 2018 THE HOPE & HISTORY MURAL PROJECT DEBUTS AT PUBLIC ART WEEK Public Art Week, an annual event hosted by the , is an opportunity for the city to celebrate local art and to reassert the ‘public’ aspect of public art. Not only a moment to celebrate Jacksonville’s arts scene, it also invites locals to be a part of it–and not just by passive appreciation. ‘The Hope and History Mural Project,’ an initiative by the University of North Florida’s Center for Urban Education and Policy (CUEP), embodies this spirit, as a fusion of …

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