Lifestyle

Behind the Curtain: Karrissa Wade’s Rush to Radiance

Words & photos by Kara Carter Watch Karrissa Wade Get Ready For A Drag Show Here.  As Pride Month unfurls, it is not just a time for celebration, but a reminder of the journeys many have taken for authenticity, acceptance and self-love. Karrissa T. Wade, Jacksonville’s favorite drag queen, is a shining example of a person who embodies those values.  To show us what that looks like, Wade took us to Tulua Bistro in Springfield where her face and name are plastered on the front window promoting her performances and other events (not to mention her own celebrity prayer candles …

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Simply Stitch Co.

Words by Jillian Lombardo In today’s competitive business landscape, standing out from the crowd is crucial. Simply Stitch Co., a Jacksonville-based business, empowers companies to do just that. They offer exceptional embroidery, screen printing, and eye-catching vehicle wraps, all delivered with a commitment to exceptional customer service and lightning-fast turnaround times. After losing their jobs simultaneously, longtime friends Luis Montiel and Ryan Viti were starting fresh in a shaky job market. Having worked together previously and sharing expertise in fashion and clothing manufacturing, they looked to opportunities in their passions before rejoining corporate America. In that time, Montiel found a …

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A Healthier Jax and a Healthier You

  Words by Briana Pereira Never in my life have I ever wanted to be a runner girlie more than I have in the past year. Active clubs both globally and throughout Jacksonville have been on the rise. Run clubs, pickleball groups and more have been popping up all over our city, providing outlets for fitness and friendship. If improving your health is something you’ve wanted to focus on this year, it’s never too late to get involved in a local active group, here are two local clubs in Jax that you can check out.  Neptune Run Crew is the …

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Make America Late Again – The San Marco Train Saga

Words by Carmen Macri  Remember when Wendy’s Twitter account went supernova with their comeback tweets a few years back? Well, brace yourself for déjà vu, but on a neighborhood level. This time, it’s not a fast-food joint, it’s the San Marco Train Twitter account causing a stir. Yep, that infamous train — the one responsible for gridlock, tardiness excuses and a cacophony of noise complaints (seriously, is that volume even legal?)   In 2016, amidst the frustration of the San Marco Train’s notorious delays, a new Twitter account emerged aiming to inject humor into the situation. Yet, its idea of …

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‘Senseis, Bars and Scars’

The anarchic lifestyle of a patron boxing fighter Words by Carson Rich In the realm of literature, there are certain works that not only entertain but also enlighten, offering readers a glimpse into the intricacies of human experience. Such content is found in “Senseis, Bars, and Scars: My Crazy Teenage Journey Through Florida’s Nightclub Boxing Scene,” written by Robert Ingram and Louis Martin. In the book, Ingram takes us through his early life in the Jacksonville patron boxing scene (aka nightclub boxing) and the chaotic nature of what he went through on a day-to-day basis.    Patron boxing can be …

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The Effects of Redlining and Food Deserts in Jacksonville 

  Words by Kelila Ritchie In a city where Whole Foods, Publix and Fresh Market can amicably exist within a three-mile radius from each other; just on the other side of a connecting bridge, an entire community struggles to make ends meet daily.     This is the situation in District 7. One of the largest districts in Jacksonville and arguably, the most underserved community in Jacksonville, District 7 includes northwest Jacksonville (also known as the Northside) historic Eastside, Downtown and surrounding areas. It’s also the result of redlining, which leads to food deserts, among other things.   REDLINING During the …

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Florida Once Upon a Time… Prohibition, Rum-Runners and Shady Characters

Words by Ted Hunt   The 18th Amendment to the United States Constitution prohibiting the manufacture, sale or transportation of intoxicating liquors was ratified in 1919 and went into effect in January of 1920. The often-called Prohibition Amendment, aimed at curbing alcohol consumption, forced the closing of hundreds of breweries and put an end to thousands of saloons across the nation. However, it had the unintended consequence of fueling a thriving, and illegal underground industry.     Despite the law, millions of Americans chose to drink anyway, so the demand for booze had to be satisfied through illegal means. There was …

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The Dark History of Gossip 

  Words by Carmen Macri and Ambar Ramirez  We’ll just start by saying that we love to gossip. Most people do, and if you claim otherwise, you’re probably lying because believe it or not, gossiping was (and is) a very normal, acceptable, social interaction.    In today’s world, gossiping refers to casual or unconstrained conversations or reports about other people, typically involving details that are not confirmed as being true, but that wasn’t always the case. Gossip wasn’t always viewed negatively. Surprisingly, back in the 12th century, medieval churches saw gossiping as morally neutral, even mentioning it in sermons. Some …

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Florida Once Upon a Time…

Stogie-Cigar Capital of the World Words by Ted Hunt   In the land of sunshine, oranges, tourism, retirees, alligators and pythons, there exists a rich tradition that goes far beyond the theme parks and countless rows of condominiums. Florida’s cigar industry, often overshadowed by more prominent industries and attractions, has quietly thrived, and the tradition of cigar making holds a significant place in the state’s history, culture and economy. So grab a stogie and let’s embark on a journey through the fascinating history of Florida’s cigar industry where hand rolling cigars is more than just a craft, it’s practically a …

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Lucy’s Legacy

Turning lemons into lemonade stands and funding for childhood cancer Words by Kerry Speckman Cancer is the leading cause of death by disease in children past infancy in the U.S. Let that sink in for a minute. Then consider this. The federal government allocates billions of dollars each year to the National Cancer Institute (NCI) and National Institute of Health (NIH) for cancer research. Among the 2 million Americans who are diagnosed with cancer each year are thousands of children diagnosed with pediatric (or childhood) cancer. And to those children, the U.S. government designates less than 4% of all of …

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