Imported Folio

The University is Expanding

Susan Cooper Eastman The campus of the University of North Florida has grown dramatically in the past decade, adding, renovating or overhauling dozens of buildings, a construction boom that has rendered the campus almost unrecognizable to even recent alumni. But the school is expanding in other ways — beyond the borders of academia and the confines of its Southside campus, into the broader landscape of Jacksonville. Two years after partnering with the then-struggling-to-survive Museum of Contemporary Art Jacksonville, the college plans a similar joint venture with the financially strapped local NPR radio and television affiliate WJCT. The partnerships — essential …

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Person of the Year: Peter Rummell

Anne Schindler Peter Rummell has been a prominent figure on the Northeast Florida landscape for years — as a developer with the powerful St. Joe Company, a behind-the-scenes player in the secretive Non Group (now the Jacksonville Civic Council), a rainmaker for the GOP. None of those is the reason he was chosen Folio Weekly’s Person of the Year. Instead, it was one very specific, if hugely consequential thing that Rummell did that put him into contention for this year’s title: He broke with his party and supported a Democrat. Rummell’s decision to back Alvin Brown for mayor was a …

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Lazy Boys

In today’s musical climate, there might not seem to be much of a market for cheeky surf-punk and white-boy joke-rap. But that hasn’t stopped St. Augustine quartet Boredom from reigniting their ’90s-fueled flame. Longtime friends and Oldest City music staples Gibby Gwiazda, Tom Derringer, Tony Lippi and Jeremy Rogers reunited for the first time since 2001 for a recent December show at Freebird Live and an upcoming gig at Café Eleven. Debauched Boredom classics like “Don’t Pick on Goth Kids,” “Tony’s 24 N Still Lives With His Mama” and “Shake What Palatka Gave Ya” will be resurrected and served up …

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Dog Daze

On Sunday, Nov. 27, my life and that of my two daughters changed forever. We witnessed our family dog Benjamin being killed. Around 8 that morning, a fight started between two of my dogs, Capone and Ben. I screamed out for help, knowing it was more than I could handle alone. A man from about three houses down came to help me try to get Capone — the aggressor dog — to stop attacking Ben. I called the police, thinking they could assist me in separating them. Instead, that proved to be the cause of Ben’s demise. Police showed up …

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Rhymes with Lumb

Jacksonville City Councilmember Robin Lumb is no environmental expert — he acknowledged as much at Tuesday night’s council meeting. And he generously attributed his gaps in knowledge to all of his colleagues, urging them to leave environmental matters to the experts — the legislative equivalent of “don’t worry your pretty little head about it.” While it’s hard to insist that someone is more competent than they themselves claim, the bill before the council last week wasn’t actually all that complicated. It merely asked (in the gentle form of a council resolution, not a legally binding and enforceable council ordinance) that …

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Folks Like Us

A human piece of Jacksonville history died recently, and while somebody paid to bury him, nobody would claim him. The Nov. 13 obituary for Warren Folks, long the city’s most vocal (if not virulent) racist, listed no survivors, friends or mourners. The closest anyone came to a public embrace of the man was a lengthy comment on the Times-Union’s website by someone posting under the name “Tarantula” who claimed to know Folks well. He was, in the poster’s words, “a racist. Period.” “Sugarcoat it all you want, but Mr. Folks believed that ‘blacks were no better than animals,’ that ‘the …

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Bought & Sold

As “Where were you?” moments go, last Tuesday’s firing of Jack Del Rio/sale of the Jacksonville Jaguars ranks just ahead of the death of Michael Jackson and slightly behind the acquittal of Casey Anthony. It was a surprise, no doubt, and it had our local TV news outlets doing what they do worst — covering events for which they are unprepared. When the morning anchors on First Coast News tracked down their sports director, Dan Hicken, he couldn’t bother to shed his Jaguars hoodie for the interview. Meanwhile, the city’s other news outlets had trouble deciding whether the team’s new …

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But I Am an Author!

I’m sure you think this odd, but I’m always hesitant to tell people that I’m a published author. No, it’s not because I’m modest, because I’m not. No, it’s not because I write erotica, though I am working on something pretty steamy, but that’s neither here nor there. The reason I find myself hesitating is because the inevitable response to telling someone that I’m an author is for them to ask me where they can find my books. This is the point in the conversation when I tell them that I’m an eAuthor and usually watch their excitement fade into …

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Close to Home

The Southbank Riverwalk is a dilapidated shell of its former self — the wood splintering, the concrete supports eroded to reveal rusted rebar. Jacksonville City Councilmember Don Redman, whose district includes the Southbank, found out just how out bad things were in 2009, when a loose board prompted a bad fall off his bicycle, and he spent Thanksgiving in the hospital, with a broken leg. The condition of the 4,500-foot wooden walkway should come as no surprise to anyone who saw the project unfold. Both the city of Jacksonville and the New Orleans architect hired to build the project in …

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Trapped!

They come mostly at night, ravaging lawns and gardens, eluding traps and terrifying homeowners and children. They breed almost as quickly as rabbits, taking over suburban haunts and destroying natural habitats. They are, quite simply, running amok — particularly in some areas of Nocatee, Marsh Harbor and Guana River State Park. Feral pigs have been around for hundreds of years. A non-native species in the United States, they were brought to the Atlantic Coast of Florida by Hernando De Soto in 1539, eventually establishing vast feral colonies throughout the Southern U.S. They are now thought to number in the millions. …

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