Joanelle Mulrain

Old Arlington: The New Place to Be!

Arlington is reinventing itself–it’s on the move. Rooted in history and continuing through the , Arlington development exploded with the opening of the Mathews Bridge in 1953. Miles and miles of riverfront property wrap around the first North-to-East bend of the river from Downtown, heading out to the Atlantic Ocean. In addition to indigenous peoples, the French, Spanish, British and Americans have walked its ground, shaded under towering oak trees through centuries. Its apex began in the mid-20th century as a post-haven for new housing, expansion of communities, and soon, a private university using the namesake of the city, . …

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OLD ARLINGTON: Norman Film Studios

In 1920, Flagler’s East Coast Railway trains rolled down the tracks from the cold North to paradise down South. With bags packed carefully with top hats, watches on gold chains, silk dresses and pearls in velvet bags, onwards the snowbirds came to enjoy the Florida sunshine and bask in warm weather with the sweet smell of orange blossoms in the air. Yes, the rich and famous left the snow and sleet…and stopped in Jacksonville, part of what some called America’s Riviera, which had become the winter film capital of the world. The Rockefellers, Astors, Tiffanys and their friends brought big …

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Karpeles Manuscript Library Jacksonville Museum

Dr. David Karpeles owns more than one million rare manuscripts and documents – the world’s largest collection of which he rotates around his 12 museums, all historical buildings of which carry his name. The is located in a beautiful, 1921 neoclassical white-columned building that features windows. It is a Jacksonville gem and a national treasure. Now 78, Karpeles, a trained mathematician, and wife, Marsha, are real estate magnates who understand the importance of culture. Their investment is a collaborative passion and love of the written word and what it conveys, the paper it is written on. Their efforts have resulted …

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Paper Cutting An Art Form by Hiromi Moneyhun

Tiny cuts–-slivers taken out, piece by piece, yet the whole skeleton remains intact; the ancient Chinese practice of paper cutting is a unique art form, one that artist  has mastered. It elicits a gentle, quiet pause as we look at the beauty of each intricate piece. Hailing from , Moneyhun zeroes in on her three-dimensional pieces with a laser-like focus. Perhaps not being trained by a master of this particular art has its advantage; indeed, it must. The result of each piece cut diligently by Moneyhun is extraordinary, giving life to organic forms, such as a bonsai or volumes of …

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TEDxJacksonville 2014

What: Lecture series WHEN: Saturday, Oct 25 (10am-8pm) Location: WJCT Studios, 1 Festival Dr. Contact: www.tedxjacksonville.com This year’s ’s theme explores (un)knowing and the “vastness of potential through conscious questioning of what we think we know.” If you’re interested in learning from your past and moving on, this year’s TEDx is for you. The 2014 TEDxJacksonville TED Talks include a wide array of local and international speakers who will fall into one of four quadrants of the event: (un)restricted, (un)charted, (un)bound and (un)rest.   This year’s topics are:  (Jacksonville, environmental lawyer) – “Belonging to the Universe”  (LA, documentary filmmaker and …

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La Caroline

It was 462 years ago (1562) that  Captain  and a group of French explorers sailed west on the Atlantic Ocean and into the mouth of the St. Johns River. Ribault named this river that runs north the River of May (thus, ), and he and his men met and exchanged gifts with the indigenous Timucua Indian tribes, who had lived here for thousands of years. According to maritime journals, Ribault and the French explorers set a large stone pillar carved toward the top with three fleur-de-lis firmly into the ground by the water’s edge and claimed this beautiful, pristine land …

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Downtown Sculpture Walk

Jacksonville has opened the door to a new venue for sculpture.  in downtown Jacksonville explodes with 13 sculptures to walk through, share, and enjoy starting this September 12th. Thousands of people will have the opportunity to experience a nexus of fascinating and alluring pieces of sculpture vetted for , a project led by internationally recognized sculptor , Associate Professor of Sculpture at  and their Exhibition Curator. “The Sculpture Walk Jax streetscape exhibition showcases how the energy of sculpture can transform the way people look at this  site, our city and our community–it gives us energy from all points,” Hager says. …

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Contemporary Realism at MOCA

On September 12th, for their patrons and members only, unveils an exhibit featuring American contemporary painters , , , , , , , and . There is a reception for patrons from 6-7pm, followed by one from 7-9 pm for museum members. The general public is invited to the exhibition on September 13 through January 4. These eight current artists present a look into the contemporary trend of the realist figurative painting movement. “My portraits are about the relationship between the person and the place, especially working-class people in my age range, who are returning from college or the military …

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Cultural Council has new leadership – Tony Allegretti

A new leader has taken over the reins of , circled round his staff, and forged a collaborative path for its future.  has a vision, and he wants you to come along and be part of it.  Born in , with stops in Venice, Gulf Breeze, Florida, along the way, Allegretti has long been moving in the spheres of marketing, advocacy and art. Starting out in criminology at FSU, he began to sell ATMs in the Panhandle.Allegretti found himself at home selling and packaging ideas. He dabbled in the trade shows and set up ATM displays out of Fort Walton. …

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MOCA’s Project Atrium: Caroline Lathan-Stiefel “Wider Than the Sky”

From pipe cleaners to reused and recognized old fabrics, Pennsylvania artist  is preparing a monumental textile sculpture that will be suspended from skylight girders and cascade down to the floor 40-feet below in the Museum of Contemporary Art’s () Haskell Atrium Gallery. Influenced early on by textural components used in everyday life, such as pipe cleaners and swatches of frayed fabric woven and sewed, Lathan-Stiefel’s work has caressed walls, gently fallen over roofs of brick buildings, even been suspended from ceilings. The patterning and translucency of textural elements spark her creativity and are paralleled with the language of the brain …

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