FOLIO

73-Year-Old Staple

Rain Henderson Arriving at 3646 Post St, a line of eager people wraps around the small white building behind the Circle K. The trunk of an SUV is popped open, colorfully-socked feet sway from side to side inducing a focus only a small child licking an ice-cream cone in the heat of Florida could know. Tall, swirly, soft cream balances under hard hats and a bowl of sprinkled covered fruit rests carefully in the hands of an elderly woman. The iconic “sagging pants = no service” sign shines hilariously in the sun. Town Beer Owner, Alex Moldovan, describes Dreamette as …

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First Day of Spring

Omar Aftab While we already see the signs of winter ending, spring doesn’t officially begin until March 20th. The first day of January is technically the start of the year, but the true signifier of change and passage of time is with the seasons. The days of gray skies and brisk air are coming to an end and being replaced by warmth and life. Trees are getting their leaves back, flowers are budding, birds and butterflies are making their return. That being said, the spring equinox is really just another day of the year. If nobody told you about it, …

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Women in Photography

By Lily Snowden For centuries, women have been oppressed. Not only as people, but also as artists. Think about it: The Mona Lisa? Painted by a man. The Starry Night? Painted by a Man. The Kiss? I think you get the point. It seems for centuries women could be the subjects of art, but could never be the creators of it. Many only consider art as paintings, drawings, or sculptures, and one artform people most often overlook is photography. The fact of the matter is photography has almost always been dominated by men. The first photo was taken by a …

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Take a Walking Tour of “America’s Oldest… Celtic City” St. Augustine !

  by Albert Syeles, President of Romanza  Every March “Spanish” St. Augustine, Florida, USA, celebrates its Celtic roots with “The WORLD’s Original St. Patrick Parade”, the “St. Augustine Highland Games”, the internationally recognized “St. Augustine Celtic Music and Heritage Festival” and something NEW: “Celtic NOIR! Authors Symposium”.  St. Augustine’s has an amazing Celtic history, including Colonial Governors and historic vicars of Celtic descent, stories of romance and mystery, and most extraordinarily: St. Augustine was founded by Celts! St. Augustine’s history used to be thought-of as primarily Spanish. Even the significant British Colonial period here, which spans the American Revolution, only …

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Artists and educators Lance Vickery and Jenny Hager inspire aspiring artist and the community in general with their prolific public art

Jay Mafela Part of what makes Jacksonville so great is all the kinds of art one can find just by walking around. Some of the most memorable examples are giant sculptures by Lance Vickery and Jenny Hager. They have over 80 pieces of art in places from the Cummer Museum to the Jacksonville Zoo to Downtown. The two work as art professors at the University of North Florida. Hager is a professor of sculpture, while Vickery is an assistant professor in the same program. In addition to art  courses, Hager teaches a business in art class where young artists learn …

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Jax transplants take a grassroots approach to promoting local artists with Neighborhood Jams

Lily Snowden  There is no doubt that Jacksonville has a large local music scene. However, most of these bands have found it impossible to find their “big break” or even a stage to play on that isn’t in the living room of a house show. Challenges related to the pandemic and the high cost of equipment have discouraged many bands from performing recently, as well. Fortunately, two Jacksonville-based promoters, who also happen to be twins, are working to help local musicians and artists get the exposure they desperately need.  Originally from New Smyrna Beach, a town with an almost non-existent …

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The Dark Side of Jacksonville’s Real Estate Market

Omar Aftab In recent years, Jacksonville has become increasingly developed. People have been gathering from around the nation for the sunshine and beaches that the city provides while still being relatively slow-paced and understated compared to more tourist-based cities like Miami and Orlando. However, whereas these cities are popular for tourists, Jacksonville is becoming a place where people are settling down, and this is being reflected in the booming housing market. According to Zillow, an online real-estate marketplace company, Jacksonville is the second hottest housing market in the nation, runner-up only to Tampa. Even with an average price of more …

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And the award goes to…

Harry Moore This year’s list of Academy Award nominees is out, and the race is still wide open in many categories. Jane Campion’s The Power of the Dog led the nominations with 12, while Dune followed up, scoring 10. The Academy’s shift toward being an international awards body continued with multiple nominations for the highly-acclaimed Japanese film Drive My Car from director Ryûsuke Hamaguchi. With the ceremony set for March 27, let’s see who the favorites are for some of the major categories and who just might cause an upset. Best Picture The front runner: The Power of the Dog …

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Judging Michael

Susan Clark Armstrong Some folks think that the process to select judges is rooted in virtue so pure that attorneys with the wisdom of Solomon are somehow plucked from courtrooms, law offices or behind careening ambulances to impartially serve justness to the wrong and the wronged. They believe selection committees, canons, government agencies, state bar associations and the voters ensure that a wise and appropriate person is selected. Sometimes, the safeguards don’t work, but more often they do.  And, as in all professions, there are heroes. It’s those in the courtrooms who keep the peace, administer oaths, record the course …

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april, 2022

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