FOLIO

Carry On

Written by Nick McGregor For all the gym-tan-laundry jokes and other unfortunate “Jersey Shore” stereotypes, New Jersey has an illustrious musical history: Bruce Springsteen, Bon Jovi, Bouncing Souls and The Gaslight Anthem, to name a few, all got their start in the Garden State. Toms River folk-rock eight-piece River City Extension are seizing their rightful place in New Jersey’s musical pantheon with the ambitious sophomore album, “Don’t Let the Sun Go Down on Your Anger,” recorded with legendary producer Brian Deck (of Modest Mouse and Iron & Wine fame) at Chicago’s Engine Studios. Lead singer/songwriter Joe Michelini’s intensely personal compositions …

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Canine Fashion

Written by Dan Brown Polish off that Jaxxy Award! … Wait one Oxycontin™-pickin’ minute! You mean to tell me that no such award for excellence in Northeast Florida Music exists? Balderdash! If there is any justice in this world, “Early Reiser,” by local rock hounds DigDog, wins Album of the Year in this year’s non-existent Jaxxy Awards! Allow me elucidate my literary ejaculations with some much-needed specificity. “Early Reiser” tackles such contemporary concerns as love, pet ownership, God, sandwiches, pachyderms, begging and even Black Magic — swaying along like a wobbly hive of drugged bees, clocking in under a spellbinding …

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Smells Like Craft Spirits

Written by Nick McGregor The bumper stickers are everywhere in St. Augustine: “A quaint drinking village with a fishing problem.” In addition to being clichéd, the sentiment is outdated, since there’s nothing quaint about the city’s newest alcohol-related venture. St. Augustine Distillery Co. is the brainchild of marketing executive and former St. Johns County Cultural Council President Philip McDaniel. And by next year, he hopes Northeast Florida’s first craft distillery will be up and running in the historic Ice Plant building on Riberia Street. With $3.5 million in planned renovations and distilling legend Dave Pickerell of Maker’s Mark fame on …

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Failure to Thrive

The worst sentences I’ve come across this year haven’t been in the pages of the much-reviled mommy porn (which I’ve admittedly not read) or the fumbling, transcribed speeches of Gov. Rick Scott (which I, grudgingly, have). Rather, they’ve been in the proscribed FCAT pretests of my capable, obedient third grader. The pretests, which we were given to review after a midterm convo with our son’s teacher, dealt with birds and their habitats. Not everyone cares about birds, of course, but as grandson and daughter of an avid (read: obsessive) birder, my kid and I might be expected to land in …

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Humble Beginnings

Written by Christopher Harvey What makes a strong community?” It’s a question I asked each of 11 key people within a large urban area in the Southeastern United States. As they took a moment to prepare their answers, some longer than others, I thought of the research I had done on each person and the answer I expected to receive from them. In a well-developed documentary, the research on the front end will save a lot of time (and sometimes embarrassment) on the back end when you are actually sitting across the camera from your interviewee. I expected quite a …

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On the Rise

Written by Susan Cooper Eastman Twenty-four hours before Sarah Bogdanovitch and Marcelle Fernee loaded up their bicycles with 37 crusty and still-warm loaves of bread, and then pedaled them to customers in Ortega, Avondale, Riverside, San Marco and Springfield, they had to decide what kind of bread they wanted to bake. The two women settled on their own version of olive bread, mixing four quarts of kalamata olives prepared by Riverside Arts Market pickler Olive My Pickles, and 30 pounds of organic unbleached white flour in an industrial mixer at Murray Hill Baptist Church. After letting the giant glob of …

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Midnight Writer

Written by Marlene Dryden The Allman Brothers Band spent so much time around these parts in the late ’60s and early ’70s, it’s common to hear locals claim to having known them — or at least having seen them play. Some may even swear they smoked with Duane, or shot with Gregg — whatever. It certainly seems plausible. Gregg Allman’s new best-selling memoir, “My Cross to Bear,” details his drug use, sexual exploits and metamorphosis from awkward teen into one of the best blues-rockers of all time — and it gives credence to any Northeast Florida wannabe trying to boost …

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Get Up, Stand Up

Written by Susan Cooper Eastman Lydale Richardson learned about the Civil Rights Movement from his grandparents. When protesters in Georgia and Mississippi had to go into hiding because the Klan was trying to kill them, some came to Leonard and Eliza Atwater’s Northwest Jacksonville home. The Atwaters also gave money to the NAACP to bond demonstrators out of jail. And they became prominent figures on the local Civil Rights scene. Asked if he remembered the Atwaters, Jacksonville Civil Rights pioneer Alton Yates says, “I will never forget them as long as I live.” So there was plenty that Richardson, 29, …

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