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PLAYING AROUND

A five-panel mural, featuring Elvis Presley, Ray Charles and other local musicians, created by a group of First Coast High School students, has been installed in Downtown Jacksonville across from the Florida Theatre.

The mural was produced by 25 students in the Behavioral Education and Social Skills Teaching program.

The program is for students who have emotional and behavior difficulties and have been removed from regular classrooms.

The students and five staff members spent eight weeks in art classes planning and creating the mural. It was installed July 11 outside Dos Gatos, which is across the street from the Florida Theatre.

The project was led by Kendall Barsin, Florida Theatre director of marketing and Cathedral Arts Project teacher Laurie Brown.   More

PLAYING AROUND

The heavy hitting sounds of SOJA came through to a massive crowd at Mavericks as The Movement and John Brown’s Body opened.

The Movement has gone through some member changes over the last year and a half as their lead singer removed himself from the group. However, the group still put on a great opening act.

John Brown’s Body kept the crowd dancing as their reggae/jam band influence laid the way for SOJA.

“Give it up for The Movement and John Brown’s Body,” Hemphill said. “We've been touring with these guys for like 5 or 10 years.”

SOJA came on with their horn section blasting to “Mentality,” a song that is meant to open up people’s thoughts to the world around them.

“We were the students but now we’re the ones who teach, we were the children who your lies we did believe. But we ain’t kids no more and we don’t need your speech,” lead singer Jacob Hemphill sang.

Following the first track off of their latest album “Strength to Survive,” SOJA went back to their hit single “I Don’t Wanna Wait” off of their 2009 album “Born in Babylon.”

The song expressing their views for better change in the country around them had the crowd’s hands going up and down with the beat.

“Moving forward to right now, a government that let you down, a racist leader no one trusts and an army that’s bigger than us,” Hemphill sang.

After playing “Decide You're Gone” the band followed with their acoustic track “She Still Loves Me,” however it was done in a much more upbeat tempo and the group did not hold back its enthusiasm.

Though experiencing technical difficulties during the first few songs, including mic feedback and guitar sound, the group continued on with the show.

The powerful album title song, “Strength To Survive,” drew multiple cheers as the band sang of the world’s condition.

Bobby Lee, bassist and vocals, dropped his sunglasses down for the song he originally wrote in the …   More

PLAYING AROUND

At first, the concept of Christian metal might send up a red flag. It’s an oxymoron between the worlds of furrowed-brow conservatives and the carefree piss-and-vinegars giving them a collective, pounding migraine.

But it’s a thing, and if you’re not keen on hearing damage on tap, call-help-there’s-blood-in-my-larynx screaming and tattoo placement that will shatter the prospect of gainful employment — stick to Toby Keith, ‘cause most of that is still here. If you are into that kind of stuff but don’t want the holy business shoveled down your gullet, this is a convenient genre; you can’t begin to decipher the message without a thorough listen-a-long with the lyric book liner (necessary) in one hand and a bottle of aspirin (recommended) in the other.

The only quick indicator of this being a unique, niche area of metal is the audience. These are pretty average, yes-ma’am-no-ma’am, A-B Honor Roll kids. About 520 of these bright seeds packed into Murray Hill Theatre March 23 to watch The Devil Wears Prada play tunes to make them want to head bang themselves into whiplash and generously clobber the pulp out of one another in a form of dance more closely resembling a merciless blood-sport than any outward expression of merriment.

But it’s all in good fun, and the Dayton, Ohio, five-piece (now touring as a six) didn’t disappoint. Everything about their sound is urgent and intense. Crushingly loud guitars layer over crashing cymbals, piercing snare drum and that growling, impassioned singer. Like traditional metal, the band utilizes very tight stop-and-go-rhythms — head-banging and scissor kicking and generally making a ruckus of things along with them.

Guitarist Jeremy DePoyster impressively managed to nail every note on the guitar and his sung choruses despite having a mop-head of hair in his face the entire set — and that’s not saying the music is simple to play. It’s not. The speed at which Prada performs their songs, …   More

Our Picks

HIP-HOP

YING YANG TWINS

You’ve known the Atlanta-based platinum hip-hop duo Ying Yang Twins ever since hearing their songs in the mid-2000s — they stuck there, like it or not. Club hits like “Get Low,” “Salt Shaker,” “The Whisper Song” and “Shake” were guilty pleasures, what you danced to in the privacy of your living room. It’s weird that these two — Kaine and D-Rock — get crunk on Jack Rabbits’ small indie-rock stage, but weird’s been known to happen. Deal with it, as Ying Yang Twins perform with Drazah & Tunk and Big Boi Moneymakers. 8 p.m. July 25, Jack Rabbits, San Marco, $20 in advance.   More

PLAYING AROUND

Although they’ve been around since 2009, the indie rock band Dead Stars, is beginning to make more noise than ever.

The three-piece band — cousins and Jacksonville natives Jeff and Jaye Moore and friend John Watterberg from Albuquerque, N.M. — just finished recording their second album, "High Gain." The five-song EP is set to drop June 4.

Dead Stars has recently gained notoriety after the single "Waste Away” was featured on MTV Hive’s website.

But guitarist Jeff Moore says he's taking the recent publicity with a grain of salt.

"It’s great. The ultimate goal, of course, is for as many people to hear your music as possible. You obviously want to enjoy what you do, and you want other people to hear it. Any time people are paying attention it’s cool. … I just want to keep on going and keep making music. Whatever happens, happens. We’ve been doing this for a while … so you try to not get too excited or too bummed either way. Whether things are good or bad you just try and keep going,” he said.

When asked what type of genre Dead Stars fits into, Jeff said that although they joke about being “nerd grunge,” they consider themselves more of a fuzz pop or indie rock band, but that there’s really no right answer.

“There’s so many different kinds of music put under the indie umbrella now, but I just feel that for us [it’s] just having that simple set up of drums, bass, guitar and vocals, of course. I like to explore what we can in that minimalist type of setup.”

The band finds a lot of inspiration from bands both old and new. Growing up, The Beatles were one of these inspirations.

Today, they listen to a variety of bands. The combination of older bands from the late '80s and early '90s, like Dinosaur Jr. and newer bands, such as Yuck, provide inspiration in finding their own, unique sound.

Writing the songs themselves is very …   More

PLAYING AROUND

Three years ago, Dead Tank Records closed its doors and Josh Jubinsky began focusing on his highest priority: family.

“Selling records at shows, touring with a band or trying to operate a store and job at the same time,” Jubinsky said in an email interview. He felt he could not properly put family as his top priority.

Working at the Main Library in the children’s department for almost 10 years now, Jubinsky says, “it’s very helpful to have a steady job and a great place to work. I’m really lucky in that regard.”

Now, Jubinsky and Dead Tank are back with upcoming releases are already in the works. A 7” split involving musicians Captive Bolt and author Gary Francione is nearly complete as the B-side is already available on their site deadtankrecords.wordpress.com. “It should be out in June,” Jubinsky said.

With the hiatus set in motion as his daughter was born, passions were shifted for Jubinsky. “As far as ‘true passions’ go, I’d say raising my daughter takes the cake.” However, music is still very important to Jubinsky as he wants to impress that upon his growing child.

Also in the works, Emperor X will be set to release a record after his return from Europe, where he is currently touring. “Right now, we’re still ironing out the details for the record, and actually he’s very busy having a great time on tour in Europe.”

Family man, record producer and a builder of his own furniture, Jubinsky looks to create that perfect balance where family is his No. 1 priority as he continues his grand music endeavors.   More

Our Picks

FOLK POP

JOHNNYSWIM

At times hokey, vague couplets like “We’re the fire, from the sun/we’re the light, when the day is done” are the norm for this husband-and-wife songwriting duo, but Johnnyswim’s able musicianship on their debut record, Diamonds, made that an easier pill. Amanda Sudano Ramirez, daughter of disco diva Donna Summers, leads most of the catchy, heartfelt pop material with a delicate, affecting voice. It’s pitch-perfect, but not so polished as to sound inorganic. Abner Ramirez, who studied at Douglas Anderson School of the Arts, supports the melodies with an equally able, dynamic voice and acoustic guitar. No earth-shaking going on here, but that’s OK. 7:30 p.m. July 25 at Ponte Vedra Concert Hall, $22.   More

PLAYING AROUND

The St. Johns Cultural Council honors women in the community for making significant contributions in the arts with its fifth annual Recognizing Outstanding Women in the Arts (ROWITA) ceremony at 6 p.m. March 10 in the Black Box of the Limelight Theatre in St. Augustine.

These women will be honored and recognized during the program followed by a reception. The keynote speaker is Jean Rahner, co-founder of Limelight. The 2013 winners are Diane Bradley, Debbie McDade, Patti Rang, Mary Siess and Wendy Tatter.

Bradley is an educator of the arts and a visual artist who is passionate about youth involvement in the art world. For the past eight years, Bradley has jointly presented the Annual All-County High School and Middle School Arts Show alongside the St. Johns County Schools. Bradley also led to the creation of the annual Tactile Show for the blind and visually impaired, which is now in its 12th year. Bradley continues to donate her time and efforts to the St. Augustine Art Association by managing their biggest fundraiser, the annual Spring and Fall Art and Craft Festivals and the Nature and Wildlife Exhibition.

McDade is a jazz singer who went to New York as a teenager to pursue her career. McDade is listed in the Encyclopedia of Jazz, and she adopted the stage name Debby Moore, which was given to her by Louis Armstrong. McDade released her record, My Kind of Blues in 1959. McDade sang alongside American jazz pianist Earl “Fatha” Hines and has also starred in movies while working in Japan. McDade is active in community efforts, while serving a board member of Excelsior Museum and Cultural Center and the Foot Soldiers Memorial Project.

Rang has been a cultural advocate and re-enactor in the creation and organization of events to celebrate the colonial life of St. Augustine for more than 30 years. She is a leader and contributing member of the East Florida Rangers and the 60th Regiment of Foot in local and regional events. Rang wrote a cookbook …   More

Our Picks

THEATER

33 VARIATIONS

In a parallel tale of obsession and dying, 33 Variations focuses on one woman’s journey to understand the motivation of one of Beethoven’s last works. Musicologist Katherine Brandt (played by Sinda Nichols), diagnosed with ALS, is trying to make sense of Beethoven’s strange compulsion to put aside other pieces, with failing health and hearing loss, to write 33 separate variations of an Anton Diabelli waltz. The 5 & Dime Theatre Company and director Lee Hamby produce the play, written by Moisés Kaufman (The Laramie Project). 6 p.m. dinner (7:30 p.m. show) July 25 and 26; 12:30 p.m. brunch (2 p.m. show) July 27 at The Cummer Museum of Art & Gardens, Riverside, $37 with dinner, $15 show only (in advance).   More

PLAYING AROUND

Not many were prepared for the buckets of rain that poured for more than three hours at the Sublime with Rome concert July 20 at the St. Augustine Amphitheatre. Many a beer was diluted as concertgoers made the dash from the concession area back to the cover of the amphitheater.

Despite the less-than-ideal concert conditions and unrelenting heat, fans were all smiles. The energy of the crowd was sky high when doors opened and swelled as the night drew closer to the hour when Sublime with Rome would take the stage. HB Surround Sound, Julian Marley and Pennywise got the night started and really put the crowd in an upbeat mood.

Sublime with Rome are on their summer tour with guests Pennywise and the Descendents.

The music and energy were on point for the night. Lead singer and guitarist Rome Ramirez, drummer Josh Freese and bassist Eric Wilson swaggered onto the stage to earsplitting excitement from the crowd. More than 3,500 voices rang out in answer to Rome Ramirez as he grabbed the mic and greeted adoring fans. 

"What's up, St. Augustine and Jacksonville! We're so happy to be back in Florida!" cried Rome before breaking into their first set. Beyond that, Sublime with Rome didn't do much to interact with the crowd, which could have added so much to an already supercharged and excited audience. 

Sublime with Rome played some of their newer songs, written after Rome joined the band, including "Panic" and "Take It or Leave It." They also played a lot of Sublime originals:  "Bad Fish," "Date Rape," "Smoke Two Joints," "Summer Time" and "April 29, 1992." Concertgoers were on their feet dancing and singing throughout the night, but they really went wild with each Sublime original.   More

 
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