Do you have something to share? Submit your stuff
Viewing 1 - 10 of 79
THE FLOG

The family of a 19-year-old Jacksonville teenager who suffocated to death in the Clay County Jail while a corrections officer looked on from a few feet away has agreed to a $2.2 million settlement of a federal lawsuit charging that Clay County Sheriff Rick Beseler and eight correction officers who worked in the jail violated Linsinbigler’s constitutional rights.

The settlement is a victory for Linsinbigler’s mother Valerie, who has said she wants to advocate for prison reform and prisoner rights to honor her son. Before entering a mediation hearing on Oct. 24, Linsinbigler told Folio Weekly it would be a difficult decision to settle if it prohibited her from speaking about what happened to her son. Valerie Linsinbigler could not be reached for comment after news of the settlement broke late last week.

As Folio Weekly reported in July, Linsingbigler died after he’d been pepper sprayed, tied into a restraint chair and had his head covered with a spit hood to contain the tears, snot and saliva pouring from his eyes, nose and mouth because of the pepper spray. Within an hour, was dead.

Linsinbigler was in solitary confinement for a total of 10 days after a misdemeanor arrest for trespassing and indecent exposure. He was found running naked along the breezeway of an Orange Park motel shouting that he was God. He told officers in booking that he’d taken two hits of acid, so he was placed in solitary confinement in the medical wing overnight. The next day, officers found him naked again, telling other inmates he was Jesus. When a nurse spoke to him, he said he knew he had to die. That landed him back in solitary confinement on suicide watch.

The night before his death, Linsinbigler became agitated. He pounded on his cell door and threw his body against it repeatedly. He wanted to see his attorney. He wanted to know his next court date. He wanted to fill out an request form. Officers gave him the form. The blank form was found in …   More

THE FLOG

Despite “winning” 58-42, Amendment 2 did not reach the 60 percent vote threshold it needed in order to become enshrined in the state constitution. To this I say thank God (and by “God,” I mean the Christian God, not any of these lesser heathen deities, thank you very much). Just think for a moment what it would be like if this horrifying amendment had passed. Could you imagine the reefer madness that would ensue as a bunch of Seth Rogens slow-drive around our fair state in Mystery Machines with free rein to hit their bongs? Luckily, Florida voters, in their infinite wisdom, were sharp enough to have not been dragged down the same path as the American Obama-nations like Oregon, Colorado and Washington. No, we would not be led into temptation by cherub-looking John Morgan and his “army of angels” and their slick-talking lawyer-speak. Check out the weaselish wording of Amendment 2 on the official Election Day ballot below.

Amendment 2 - Marijuana Medical

• Allows the medical use of marijuana for individuals with debilitating diseases as determined by a licensed Florida physician. Allows caregivers to assist patients’medical use of marijuana. The Department of Health shall register and regulate centers that produce and distribute marijuana for medical purposes and shall issue identification cards to patients and caregivers. Applies only to Florida law. Does not authorize violations of federal law or any non-medical use, possession or production of marijuana.

As you can detect, they were trying to slip by us the preposterous notion that individuals in intense pain should get to decide their own vehicle of relief. That’s an awfully slippery slope. And I don’t want to hear anymore whining about “pain relief.” If you want relief from agonizing, life-threatening pain, then you get it the way our Founding Fathers intended: man the fuck up and down some …   More

THE FLOG

They're heeeeere. No, not frightening poltergeists making their presence known through the static on your TV screen — I’m talking about something much more frightening: the annual Gator and Bulldog super-fan takeover of Jacksonville for the Florida-Georgia weekend. No event is more definitive of our small-town-meets-heavily-populated-metropolis than this, the "World’s Largest Outdoor Cocktail Party." If you’ve never been here for this shindig, for about a good half week, the area surrounding our Downtown football stadium looks like the inside of the NASCAR track at Daytona International Speedway on race day. It is here that close to 100 Winnebagos line the parking lots and street sides in what is called “RV city,” populated by UF and UGA faithful here to watch their respective university’s indentured-servant football players take the field in one of the most heralded rivalries in minor league college athletics.

Obviously, this event has a profound impact on our local economy, with fans projected to spend $18 million in our fair city this weekend. It fills Jacksonville hotels — usually teeming with superfluous business travelers looking to cheat on their spouses, vacationers on their way to or from South Florida, and unhygienic Craigslist transactions — to the brim with reservations for drunken SEC fans from out of town. It gives Duval cab drivers something more to do than just sit in grocery store parking lots and look creepy. It provides towering-chicken-wing-platter-carrying waiters at local sports bars an opportunity to be undertipped by tourists instead of the usual local barflies. And it isn’t just the obvious businesses and products that are affected by FL/GA, as the impact seems to reach all the way into every nook and cranny of area commerce, sometimes in mystifying ways. When I was a teenager, my dad …   More

THE FLOG

We’ve all heard the old saying “It must be something in the water” used to describe the particular and peculiar characteristics of a region. This saying is, of course, usually not meant to be taken literally. In the case of Jacksonville, however, there may actually be something to it.

That’s right, Jacksonville, we’ve yet again managed to make one of those lists — the ones that reveal the worst cities for something or other, usually rounded off into a tidy top-10 and then tossed around the Internet as something for you to read at work while avoiding your responsibilities. A lot of times these lists are completely arbitrary, based on flimsy citizen satisfaction polls, and are ultimately pointless Google Adsense bait, but this one concerns a scientific analysis of the make-up of our drinking water. You know, H2O, the essential building block of life and the molecule that makes up about 65 percent of our bodies? Yeah, it’s kind of a big deal.

From the Daily Finance:

 "...some organizations and state environmental agencies that collect and analyze water data say the level of chemicals in some Americans' drinking water not only exceeds recommended health guideline but the pollutants even exceed the limits set by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the national legal authority in these matters...."

 10. Jacksonville, Fla. (JEA)

Located on the northeast coast of Florida, Jacksonville is the state's largest city. According to EWG (Environmental Working Group in D.C.), 23 different toxic chemicals were found in Jacksonville's water supply. The chemicals most frequently discovered in high volumes were trihalomethanes, which consist of four different cleaning byproducts -- one of which is chloroform. Many trihalomethanes are believed to be carcinogenic. Over the five-year testing period, unsafe levels of trihalomethanes were detected during each of the 32 months of testing, and …   More

SPORTSTALK: THE JAG-OFF

Another home game for the Jacksonville Jaguars, another chance for Blake Bortles to make the leap. This game was the biggest start in his young career.

Why? Because the Dolphins are arguably the Jaguars’ biggest rivals, if for no other reason than proximity. And Dolphins QB Ryan Tannehill, in many ways, is an analog for Bortles: a young, up-and-down quarterback who can run if he needs to (both were top-five QB rushers coming in). Tannehill has looked increasingly sharp this year, but the jury was out on both of them coming into Sunday’s clash.

And it still is afterward. Tannehill was yet another quarterback who floundered in the face of an initially opportunistic Jags D (just 56 yards allowed in the first half). And Bortles? A dumpster fire. Yes, he threw two long touchdown passes. Both, however, went to Dolphins defenders.

Some missed opportunities for Jags’ offense were not on Bortles, such as the bomb Allen Robinson dropped on the first drive that should have been caught. For every one of those, though, there were things like the two pick-sixes — Bortles’ 11th and 12th of the year, even though he didn’t start until Week 4 — and the fumble in the second quarter. At times, especially on third down, he looked Gabbertesque. Except Gabbert never had a running back like Denard (apologies to MJD apologists).

The Jags opened up the route tree in the third quarter, going deep, which only exposed Bortles as the Dolphins stopped respecting the run and blitzed.

As the game progressed, Gus Bradley looked less and less like an NFL coach. More Tom Arnold than Tom Landry, Gus’ team once again looked outmatched in the second half. What was a winnable game at intermission was over long before the third quarter ended. Tannehill sharpened up as the fourth quarter commenced, one-liners and fart wafts filled the press box, and a “Let’s Go Dolphins” chant pervaded the cleaner air outside it.

On a day …   More

THE FLOG

Although no one has been held accountable or disciplined in any way for the death of 19-year-old Daniel Linsinbigler in the Clay County Jail on March 12, 2013, the Clay County Sheriff’s Office has agreed to settle a federal civil rights lawsuit the Linsinbigler family filed for a seven-figure sum, according to Valerie Linsinbigler, Daniel’s mother. 

At a mediation hearing at 9:30 a.m. on Friday, attorneys for the Linsinbiglers and Clay County will try to negotiate the terms of a settlement. Valerie Linsinbigler says that she knows such settlement agreements sometimes include gag orders that prohibit everyone from talking about the details of the case. That will be difficult for her, she says.

“It’s kind of a double-edged sword for me,” she tells Folio Weekly. “The last 20 months have literally taken the life out of me. Going to trial and all that stuff — every day it’s taken a little more.” But while going to trial offered the prospect of even more heartache, it also offered the potential for answers. Valerie wanted to hear from the Clay County deputies who were with Daniel when he suffocated to death while they were just a few feet away. She wanted them to explain why they didn’t intervene as he gasped for air. 

Daniel, who was quite clearly mentally ill and in obvious need of more robust psychiatric care than his jailers bothered to offer — he’d been arrested during a psychotic break, while he was walking around an Orange Park motel naked and telling anyone who would listen that he was God — was pepper sprayed and removed from his cell in solitary confinement on March 12. He’d been placed in solitary on suicide watch after his arrest on March 2. After pepper-spraying him, deputies tied to a restraint chair and placed a spit hood over his head to contain the tears running down his face, the mucus pouring from his nostrils and the saliva running from his mouth in …   More

THE FLOG

Related: The Night The Beatles Came to Town (and Almost Died Here)

If you can’t make out the handwriting in the above image, it says: 

WHEN “SIR” PAUL COMES TO TOWN WHY DON’T YOU INTERVIEW HIM AND ASK HIM IF HE IS A GRADUATE OF TAVISTOCK INSTITUTE? HE’LL KNOW WHAT YOU MEAN? 

According to this impeachably reputable website we found through the Google machine, the relationship between The Beatles and Tavistock Institute to which our writer is referring goes something like this (take a deep breath … and … go):

The phenomenon of the Beatles was not a spontaneous rebellion by youth against the old social system. Instead it was a carefully crafted plot to introduce by a conspiratorial body which could not be identified, a highly destructive and divisive element into a large population group targeted for change against its will. New words and new phrases--prepared by Tavistock(1)-- were introduced to America along with the Beatles. Words such as "rock" in relation to music sounds, "teenager," "cool," "discovered" and "pop music" were a lexicon of disguised code words signifying the acceptance of drugs and arrived with and accompanied the Beatles wherever they went, to be "discovered" by "teenagers." Incidentally, the word "teenagers" was never used until just before the Beatles arrived on the scene, courtesy of the Tavistock Institute for Human Relations. 

… Tavistock and its Stanford Research Center created trigger words which then came into general usage around "rock music" and its fans. Trigger words created a distinct new break-away largely young population group which was persuaded by social engineering and conditioning to believe that the Beatles really were their favorite group. All trigger words devised in the context of "rock music" were designed for mass control of the new targeted group, the youth of America. 

The Beatles did a perfect job, or perhaps it would be …   More

THE FLOG

Grab your guns, crank up the truck and blast the Skynyrd, Duval, cause the South is gon’ rise again! Well, sort of … and, OK, this time, we’re technically going to be the North … oh, and it’s not a secession, really … and it’s not really our idea, but … but … Free Bird!

The real issue at hand is that a group of politicians in South Miami are essentially sick and tired of the northern part of Florida leaving them out to dry (or actually the opposite of that) when it comes to climate change issues in the southern part of the state. In response, they’ve proposed a bold but completely Florida-esque solution: Split the state in half and create their own state of “South Florida,” which would thus become the 51st state … if you count both Dakotas, but really, what’s the point of that? 

To answer your first question: no, this isn’t a story from The Onion. (This is, though.) This call for the legal separation of Florida into two separate states was actually cooked up — with delicious Cuban spices, I presume — by the mayor and city commission of South Miami. The threat of rising sea levels as a result of global warming, and the rest of the state’s blase attitude toward said crisis, was cited as the reason behind the proposal, which would slice Florida in half like a ripe grapefruit from approximately Orlando down.

Wait, Orlando? Oh no, you didn’t! You can take our beautiful Everglades National State Park away from us, but DO NOT FUCK with Mickey Mouse or our chintzy discount brand outlet stores!

From the Sun-Sentinel:

Orange County is particularly important because that's where the South Florida Water Management District begins, [Vice Mayor Walter] Harris said. It was even suggested that a Central Florida city could possibly be the state of South Florida's capitol.

Given the large number of Baptist churches here in North Florida, …   More

THE FLOG

A disheartened University of Florida fan, appearently unhappy by the Gators’, shall we say, lackluster performance these last two years under Will Muschamp, has posted an ad on the Gainesville Craigslist looking for new head football coach candidates, and inviting serious prospects to contact Athletic Director Jeremy Fowler immediately. 

If you would like to be considered, according to the ad, you should meet the following qualifications: 

- Because UF is a DESTINATION coaching job, applicants must have ALREADY had head coaching experience. This is not a stepping stone job offering OJT or otherwise prepares you for another position in the NFL or other university in the future. If hired, you must be previously groomed to 1) Win consistently, 2) Stay for more than 4 seasons, and 3) have composure when roaming the sidelines. Composure includes but is not limited to 1) not screaming at players & referees regularly, 2) resisting facial expressions suggesting you are ready to commit violent acts on the sideline, 3) not taking personal shots at other fan bases on live tv after barely winning a game you should have lost, and 4) not looking like a deer in the headlights when things go wrong... repeatedly, caused on the field by your own first-teamers. 

- To understand, embrace and embody the winning traditions associated with the University Of Florida. This includes winning games against in-conference rivals as well as the women's college (aka the clown college) down the road. Winning every single solitary game is not required (Bear Bryant didn't even win them ALL), but you must post a winning record against your key foes throughout your tenure as Head Football Coach.

- Ability to win games against glorified high schools and junior colleges, aka "cupcakes", especially when the contest is held on the university's own campus.

- To win football games in a manner that is not only acceptable on the scoreboard, but consistently impressive …   More

THE FLOG

Last night, the roughly 7 percent of undecided Florida voters were “treated” to the second of three gubernatorial debates between former Gov. Charlie “The Tanned One” Crist and current Gov. Rick Scott, best known for his previous work as Harry Potter villain Voldemort. In typical Florida fashion, this debate featured what could have possibly been the most awkward start to a debate in the history of debates, which is pretty hard to do considering that debates are to awkwardness what baseball is to spitting. As many of you are by now aware, Rick Scott held up the start of the debate for several minutes by refusing to take the stage in protest of Charlie Crist having a fan under his podium in what is now being termed #fangate (because everyone’s so clever; FWIW, #fantrum is much better). 

Scott’s campaign contended that Crist broke the rule that there were to be “no electronic devices” at the debate. While technically correct, as pointed out by the moderator, this was a bold move for someone who would have a hard time convincing a court that he is not a Disney animatron (LOL, j/k — we all know Scott isn’t an animatron; he’s obviously a reptilian). Perhaps Scott thought that the fan would unjustly help Crist appear cool and collected, or maybe the current gov wanted to throw Crist off his game by taking away his ever-present binky. Truth be told, Scott was probably just bitter because he wasn’t allowed to take onto the stage his own electric device of choice — a laser death ray.

As Scott continued to hold out, for about six minutes, a confused panel of moderators (including Times-Union editor Frank Denton) and a befuddled Crist were left on the Broward College stage wondering what the hell to do. The moderators were about to bust into their vaudeville routines, while Crist was considering running back and forth between the two podiums debating himself, which probably …   More

 
Download our dojax app
What do you think? Browse
How do you feel about Angela Corey’s decision in the Nippers shooting?
Post your review here …