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SONIC DEATH Wednesday, June 17
Local neo-psych heads Mother Superior offer an uneven yet worthwhile release
TRANCE ENCOUNTERS Wednesday, June 17
L.A. alt-industrial, dark wave rockers The Dreaming create latest release via long-distance digital
TRAIN KEPT A ROLLIN’ Wednesday, June 17
Chuggington Live!
CLASSICAL GAS Wednesday, June 17
St. Augustine Music Festival
DANCEHALL DAZE Wednesday, June 17
Chronixx
RAD COMPANY Wednesday, June 17
Double Skate Events
OKIE, MON! Wednesday, June 17
Broncho
ABLE-BODIED IN THE COVERAGE GAP Wednesday, June 17
Is Medicaid expansion a handout or a leg up?
A RECORD OF THE REACTION Wednesday, June 17
Tyler Shields’ most recent work sparked both outrage and conversation. And that was the intention.
It’s been nearly three years since Cal-Berkeley psychologists Paul Piff and Dacher Keltner published their research on what has come to be called the wealth-empathy gap. Their studies provided some of the first scientific evidence that the appropriate caricature of the upper class may be more Montgomery Burns than Thurston Howell III. To review, Piff and Keltner conducted multiple studies to find out if social class (as measured by occupational prestige, wealth, and education) effects how much people care about the feelings of others. They found that wealthy individuals were less likely to consider the needs of others or feel compassion for those who may be sick or poor, and they are more likely to agree that greed is justified, beneficial, and morally defensible.