Do you have something to share? Submit your stuff
Viewing 61 - 70 of 103
BITE-SIZED

Three years ago, when notorious Food Network host Guy Fieri of "Diners, 
Drive-ins and Dives" rode into historic Riverside to film an episode at already-popular 13 Gypsies, he catapulted the tiny restaurant onto the larger culinary map. Reservations are highly recommended (even for lunch), since there are only a handful of tables and just two chefs. And while the restaurant itself may be small, the tapas-style offerings are huge on variety and flavor.

Owner and chef Howard Kirk, who grew up in Spain, ensures that his Spanish dishes are created from scratch with quality ingredients. All of the bread is made in-house each morning. While items may be slightly pricey, it's worth the splurge for date night or a small dinner with friends. You've been warned: Popular menu items sell out. Share a carafe of fruity red wine sangria or unwind by ordering a glass of vino from the wine list.

If you order just one item (and you'll want to order several, trust me!), the risotto of the day is always a must. Made from short-grain Arborio rice, it's thick, creamy and perfectly cooked. On a recent visit, I all but licked our plate of pork shoulder risotto clean.

Another frontrunner is the Mushroom Seville. Pieces of toast topped with a light spread of goat cheese are served with a cup of creamy brandy, garlic and herb sauce chockfull of sautéed mushrooms, perfect for spooning onto the toast.

The shrimp, sautéed in olive oil, garlic and crushed red pepper, proved to be a simple yet flavorful dish with a little kick. With five jumbo shrimp, there were enough to share.

One unique tapas on a list of more than two dozen is the Roman-style gnocchi: Rectangular planks of flat Semolina flour gnocchi are pan-seared, then topped with a garlicky cream sauce, sautéed mushrooms and a generous sprinkling of freshly grated cheeses.

Relatively new to the menu are the savory crêpes. With five to choose from, it's hard to go wrong. We enjoyed the ham and …   More

BITE-SIZED

There's a quirky two-story bookstore nestled on Laura Street, and it's a bookworm's dream come true — and the food, drinks and atmosphere in the café are so enjoyable, you may never want to leave.

Walking by the store's outer façade, you might think it houses only piles of new and used books. Once you enter, you'll discover the café: exposed brick walls, lots of windows, free Wi-Fi, coffee and treats.

Everything on the menu is less than $10. There are wraps, salads, bagel sandwiches, homemade soups and breakfast items. While I haven't hit up Chamblin's for breakfast yet, it's quickly become one of my go-to spots for healthful weekday lunches.

With several piping-hot coffees (there are lattes and the like, too) to choose from, ask for a refillable mug if you plan to stay awhile, or you can opt for a cup to go. With almond milk, even vegans can get their caffeine fix.

A chalkboard out front advertises daily specials, which usually include a soup or two of the day. The folks behind the counter will probably offer you a sample if you can't decide. When's the last time you had spicy African peanut soup?

I go for one of several wraps. The jerk tempeh provides a bit of heat with a lot of flavor and can be ordered as a salad or wrap. And the Veggie No. 1 (how straightforward is that?) wrap is simple yet filling — a large tomato basil wrap stuffed with cucumbers, tomatoes, crisp chopped red pepper, sprouts, spring mix, creamy hummus, crunchy pumpkin seeds, almond slivers and vinaigrette dressing.

As for sandwiches, it's a toss-up: turkey croissant with brie and homemade cranberry chutney, which is pleasantly reminiscent of Thanksgiving but light enough for lunch, and the Bang Bang Bagel with melted cheddar cheese, garlicky house vinaigrette, red peppers, onions, roma tomatoes, cucumbers, sprouts and spring mix on a toasted, locally made bagel.

The iced Italian sodas are a must. Create your own flavor combo from a wide …   More

BITE-SIZED

Just minutes from Downtown, San Marco's Green Erth Bistro is a family-owned Persian restaurant that also provides healthful vegan and vegetarian-friendly options.

When you walk inside, you see the large community table that invites strangers to sit together. There are also several four-top tables along the perimeter, creating a cozy atmosphere as natural light streams in from the front windows.

A menu board touts daily specials. Our waitress brought us out a sample of the soup of the day — vegetarian barley ash, a thick bean, barley and herb soup-like stew — and the next thing we knew, we were staring at the bottom of the cups we ordered. It was warm and hearty, with parsley, cilantro, garlic and mint providing a lot of flavor.

We also ordered the herb tray, which featured a generous heap of fresh herbs including parsley, mint, dill and basil, a block of crumbly feta, onion and wedges of lavash bread. Drizzled with olive oil and balsamic vinegar, this was a refreshing treat.

On a recent lunch visit, I enjoyed the curry chicken salad. Chunks of white meat are tossed with a whipped mayo-less curry sauce, grapes, shallots and chives, then topped with chopped pecans. The concoction is served atop a mix of organic greens, bright red juicy tomato slices, crisp cucumbers and red onions.

Another hit was the assortment of flatbread pizzas, which were large enough for two meals. The California was topped with mozzarella, goat cheese, pressed garlic, fresh basil, balsamic glaze and sun-dried tomatoes (we subbed roasted red peppers). The crust is thin and crispy at the edges. Order a half-sized salad — I recommend the Green Erth Apple Salad with housemade sherry vinaigrette, chopped walnuts, cranberries, green onions and slices of crisp green apple — if you want to pair your pizza with something green.

You can choose from a number of kabobs, combination kabobs and skewers (along with sandwiches, wraps, salads, soups, chilis and …   More

BITE-SIZED

Next time you're considering international standbys for Chinese or Japanese, try branching out to Korean fare. With some subtle similarities to those other Asian cuisines, Korean food has its own flavor profiles. Go as a group, so everyone can pick an appetizer or entrée to share.

For an appetizer, start with haemul pajeon, a savory seafood pancake served with a tangy and spicy soy dipping sauce. Packed with scallions and an array of seafood — octopus, squid, shrimp, oysters and clams — folded into the batter, the slightly spongy haemul pajeon is lighter than an omelet but denser than a traditional American pancake. Savory, slightly sweet and salty combine for one flavorful dish.

Korean cuisine centers around the trifecta of rice, vegetables and meat. However, the rice and a wide range of vegetables take center stage. Veggies are often uncooked, in salads or pickled, or incorporated into soups, stews and stir-fried dishes.

Meals are served with a slew of side dishes called banchan, which arrive in small bowls intended for sharing and can be refilled upon request. Ingredients vary depending on the availability and seasonality of produce: pickled vegetables, cubed radishes, green onion salad, mung bean sprouts and mung bean jelly. Items may be raw, boiled, fried, sautéed, fermented, dried or steamed. The number of side dishes presented is based on the number of table guests and the importance of the occasion. For a casual table of four, roughly six items are served.

The traditional side dish kimchi — fermented cabbage mixed with Korean radish, and sometimes cucumber, along with ginger, scallions, garlic and chili pepper — mixes spicy, sweet, salty and sour sensations.

Originating almost 4,000 years ago in ancient Korea, kimchi is served in both Korea and Japan. Recipes vary by region and by seasonality of ingredients.

Originally, making kimchi was a community event, drawing families together for several days to …   More

BITE-SIZED

Northeast Florida is home to quite a few authentic Indian restaurants, so there's no shortage of places you can try.

Indian cuisine varies regionally due to a reliance on locally available spices, herbs, meat, vegetables and fruits.

In early India, the typical diet rarely included meat, instead relying heavily upon fruit, vegetables, grains, eggs, dairy and honey. Consumption of beef was taboo, as cows are considered sacred in Hinduism. Even today, beef is rare within Indian cuisine. However, chicken, followed by mutton (goat), sheep and buffalo, are frequently part of area menus. Common vegetables include cabbage, cauliflower, potato, tomato, onion, bell peppers and eggplant.

Traditional Indian flavors combine a variety of ingredients, including powdered chili pepper, black mustard seed, cardamom, cumin, turmeric, ginger, tamarind, curry leaves, bay leaves, coriander, garlic and cloves. In sweeter dishes, cardamom, saffron, nutmeg and rose petal essences are used.

Dipping sauces, called chutneys, are present at almost every Indian meal and can be spicy, sweet or sour. The dominant flavor or ingredient gives the chutney its name — coconut, tamarind, mint, coriander, peanut, cumin, tomato or ginger.

Some dishes are cooked at high temperatures in an earthenware oven called a tandoor. These include tandoori chicken, which is marinated in yogurt that's been seasoned with garam masala, garlic, cumin, cayenne pepper and ginger. Another dish, called chicken tikka, is made from small pieces of boneless chicken marinated in yogurt and spices and then grilled on skewers in a tandoor. It is then typically served with green coriander chutney.

In some regions, samosas, a popular triangular-shaped snack stuffed with spiced potatoes, peas, onions, coriander and lentils, or ground lamb or chicken, are cooked in a tandoor. In other regions, they're fried.

Just like American cuisine, menus in Northern India are quite different from the food served in …   More

BITE-SIZED

Forks. Knives. Spoons. You won't find any of these familiar items at an Ethiopian restaurant. Unlike at most dining experiences, you're encouraged to eat with your fingers. And take note: It's culturally preferred to use your right hand for eating, as the left hand is traditionally considered the appendage used for cleaning the body.

Food at an Ethiopian restaurant arrives tableside on a large family-style platter with an oversized spongy, thin, crepe-like flatbread called injera. Made with flour from a gluten-free grain called teff that's native to Northeastern Africa, injera has a slightly tangy flavor reminiscent of sourdough bread. A basketful of injera may also accompany the meal. Unroll it, rip off a piece, and use it to pinch up a scoop of food from the shared platter. Injera's porous surface is perfect for soaking up the stews and mixed vegetables.

You may notice while dining that Ethiopian cuisine closely resembles Indian cuisine. Both cultures expect food to be eaten with your fingers (Ethiopian's injera and Indian's naan), with items presented on a shared plate. Both cultures use clarified butter for cooking (niter kibbeh and ghee), which lends a complexity to dishes that regular butter or oil can't. The similarities are also apparent in spice blends — Ethiopia's berbere is much like India's garam masala. And alicha, a mild Ethiopian split pea curry with ginger, garlic and onions, bears a resemblance to some Indian curries. But the two cuisines reflect their distinct cultural heritages.

Berbere is common in many dishes. A ground powder combining chili peppers, garlic, ginger, basil, koramina and fenugreek, it has a noticeably reddish-orange hue and is mildly spicy with a hint of smokiness. Several Ethiopian stew-like sauces known as "wots" or "wats" gain their flavor from this ground powder.

Doro wat, a thick spicy chicken stew, is one of the most common foods in Ethiopia. Chicken legs are simmered in kibae, a blend of niter kibbeh, …   More

BITE-SIZED

Just over the Intracoastal Waterway bridge lies a hidden gem specializing in Eastern Shore seafood. The popular former TacoLu spot (complete with valet parking) has been redone and the coastal vibe is casual yet slightly upscale, perfect for a date night or appetizers and cocktails with co-workers.

Owner and executive chef Gary Beach brought Marlin Moon Grille of Ocean City, Md., to Northeast Florida less than a year ago. The recipes are his. He credits his Cajun grandmother for his informal culinary training, in addition to practical experience he picked up along the way in restaurants from Maryland to Florida.

Beach describes his restaurant as a "happy-go-lucky, sport-fishing themed bar with no pretense that serves simple, fresh eclectic fare at a fair price." I couldn't agree more.

Start with tuna nachos. Crunchy fried wontons are nicely plated and piled with tangy seaweed salad, a spicy cucumber wasabi mayo, vibrant sesame-crusted ahi tuna, finished with a sprinkling of scallions and a drizzle of sweet teriyaki.

The Greek kadaif-wrapped jumbo Mayport shrimp appetizer (served with a sweet red chile dipping sauce) was a delightful blend of crunchy, spicy and sweet. Kadaif is shredded phyllo dough that's light and crunchy, with a unique texture.

Everything is noticeably fresh. Even the basket of bread was perfection. Marlin Moon's daily fish specials are created from the fresh catch from nearby Safe Harbor Seafood in Mayport. And if you're a crabcake snob, do yourself a favor and order them. Definitely some of the best in town I've found. Plump, juicy and hardly any fillers in these jumbo lump crab cakes, paired with a homemade island aioli.

My entrée, the Eggplant Boat, earned an A+ for creativity. Oversized slabs of breaded and lightly fried eggplant cradle perfectly cooked scallops, shrimp and crawfish tails. A savory shiitake crab butter sauce tops the dish.

The baked mixed-berry bumbleberry pie was a tad too sweet for my liking, …   More

BITE-SIZED

Much lighter on your wallet than a trip to Latin America and much closer, Puerto Plata Restaurant serves up tasty Latin American comfort food at its location near San Juan Avenue and Blanding Boulevard.

The freestanding yellow building with ample parking and a covered front patio might not look like much, but once inside, you'll find all the staples.

Start with the chicharones de pollo, Dominican-style chunks of bite-sized fried chicken. Crisp, and slightly crunchy on the outside and extremely juicy inside, these don't need a dipping sauce — they're that good. Proceed with caution: There are still a few bones.

To complement the chicharones, try an order of plátanos maduros, or sweet fried plantains, a staple of Latin American cuisine similar to bananas. These are made with very ripe plantains cut into two-inch pieces then pan-fried, forming a slightly sticky and sweet caramelized crust.

We ordered an empanada de pollo — a crescent-shaped stuffed pastry filled with seasoned chicken and then fried. Ours wasn't very full, but the handheld golden brown snack was still good and served alongside a ramekin of a spicy green jalapeño salsa.

A traditional entrée, the pernil, or roasted pork shoulder, is topped with onions and served with a heaping mound of yellow rice and a cup of black beans. The pork was tender and moist, and I could really taste the garlic and adobo seasoning.

The star of the evening was the ceviche con tostones — shrimp ceviche with mashed fried green plantains and a creamy garlicky dipping sauce. The shrimp were marinated in citrus juices with minced onion, diced tomatoes, lots of cilantro, ground black pepper and salt, resulting in a tangy dish that was served chilled. The shrimp "cook" without any heat thanks to the acid in the fresh citrus juice.

For dessert we opted for the flan, a square of creamy baked custard draped in a sweet caramel glaze.

The restaurant has a noticeably clean, …   More

BITE-SIZED

Ever get that yearning for pizza and need to tame your hunger ASAP? Look no further than Your Pie, a fast-casual chain with a new Fleming Island location. Custom pizzas piled high (no skimping here!) with your favorite toppings are ready in a mere five minutes, thanks to a 600-degree pizza oven and nimble staff.

It's often difficult to get a group to agree on pizza toppings: Some begrudgingly pick off mushrooms and pepperoni, while others secretly wish for garlic and pineapple. Good news, picky pizza fans: Your Pie offers personal-size 10-inch pie.

While casual, the interior feels much nicer than similar assembly-line style spots like Chipotle, Moe's and Subway. Seating is abundant, and I foresee many families stopping in after Little League games or swim practices. Grownups will appreciate beer, wine, sangria and free Wi-Fi.

With more than 40 toppings (add as many non-meat toppings as you'd like without additional cost), eight sauces and nine different kinds of cheese, Your Pie caters to the tastes of all pizza lovers. Even food allergies are given serious consideration: Gluten-free pies are cooked in their own pans, and there's an option for dairy-free vegan cheese.

The crust is light and chewy without being too thin or too thick, and the edges maintain a perfect crispness. I had trouble choosing from eight sauces, but I enjoyed the flavorful sun-dried tomato pesto. On another recent visit, I tried the pizza sauce, then added shredded mozzarella, sliced tomatoes, jalapeños for kick and bacon (because, well, it's bacon).

Not in the mood for pizza? Several paninis and bread bowl salads await. I enjoyed the caprese: slices of fresh mozzarella, leafy spinach, tomatoes and shredded basil with extra virgin olive oil and a side of balsamic dressing, served in a baked pizza dough bowl.

Your Pie touts a Coca-Cola Freestyle machine, allowing for several clever soda flavor combinations, like orange vanilla Diet Coke or raspberry Sprite.

For …   More

BITE-SIZED

In the heart of Riverside lies a casual yet 
 borderline hip café, complete with free WiFi and a self-service bottomless coffee station.

Breakfast is available even at lunchtime, which is a bonus. Sometimes you just want (OK, need) an omelet, eggs Benedict or French toast in your life after a hectic morning has passed.

In addition to a clever build-your-own omelet selection, Cool Moose's menu boasts four Benedicts — traditional, smoked bacon and tomato, smoked salmon, and veggie.

Daily specials are scrawled across a blackboard, including the homemade soup selection. A recent offering, the Desayuno de Costa Rica, caught my eye: a breakfast platter with scrambled eggs, chorizo and cheddar on a grilled corn tortilla, topped with tomatillo salsa and accompanied by sweet plantains, black beans and rice.

The lunch sandwich options run the gamut — Cuban, chicken salad croissant, ham and brie panini with maple mustard, half-pound Angus burger with sharp cheddar, a gyro with tatziki, and a classic Reuben, to name a few. The chicken salad croissant, made with all white meat, is tossed with crunchy celery, red onion, walnuts and a slightly sweet honey mayo. Complement the sweetness with a side of garlicky truffle fries.

For vegetarians, options include a veggie burger on herbed focaccia bun, a marinated grilled portobello panini with roasted red pepper, provolone and sweet basil pesto (which pairs nicely with a side of crisp sweet potato fries dusted with sugar), and a grilled cheese sandwich.

Cool Moose's buttery Texas-style toast makes for a simple yet satisfying grilled cheese. You can add slices of tomato or crisp bacon if the mood strikes. Or pair your 'wich with a cup of soup for dunking.

Open 7 a.m.-3 p.m. Tuesday-Friday, 8 a.m.-4 p.m. Saturday and 8 a.m.-2 p.m. Sunday, Cool Moose can be counted on for an inexpensive, laidback bite. On the weekends, the outside tables fill up fast with patrons — mimosas in hand and pups …   More

 
Download our dojax app
What do you think? Browse
How do you feel about Angela Corey’s decision in the Nippers shooting?
Post your review here …