PLAYING AROUND

Camden County Adds Two New Shorts to Its Filmography

'Mime in a Box' and 'Preserve' are the lastest projects for Coastal Georgia Film Alliance

“Preserve” is a post-apocalyptic short that was written by Wayne Deegan and filmed at the old paper mill site in St. Marys. The setting of the short is 170 years after a disaster that drove the survivors underground. The film focuses on four people who emerge to the surface and seek safe harbor in an unwelcoming world.
Barbara Ryan
“Preserve” is a post-apocalyptic short that was written by Wayne Deegan and filmed at the old paper mill site in St. Marys. The setting of the short is 170 years after a disaster that drove the survivors underground. The film focuses on four people who emerge to the surface and seek safe harbor in an unwelcoming world.
Barbara Ryan
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Since it formed in 2010, the Coastal Georgia Film Alliance has facilitated the production of two television pilots, two full-length film features, two television series and four short films. The CGFA recently secured two new projects for Camden County, the short films “Mime in a Box” and “Preserve.”

Producer Kim Murray’s “Mime in a Box” is set to begin filming in Camden County in late spring. Murray is the producer of “The Prisoner,” another locally shot film, directed by the award-winning Mahmoud Shoulizadeh.  Shoulizadeh’s film “Noora” took first place at the 49th International Film Festival of Taormina in Italy. Samad Banks, the writer of “Mime in a Box,” has said the presentation and plot of the short is very “Twilight Zone”-ish.

“Preserve” is a post-apocalyptic short that was written by Wayne Deegan and filmed at the old paper mill site in St. Marys. The setting of the short is 170 years after a disaster that drove the survivors underground. The film focuses on four people who emerge to the surface and seek safe harbor in an unwelcoming world.

“These survivors are a lot like the pioneers in the early days of America,” Degan said. “Fighting the need to be complacent, they leave a comfortable place to explore life and improve their lot.”

According to CGFA co-founder and chair Doug Vaught, the organization works closely with the state of Georgia to fulfill location requests and see that the filmmakers’ needs are met.

“Georgia’s ‘up to 30 percent tax credits’ for filmmakers is a compelling reason for filmmakers to come to the area,” Vaught said, “but with so many locales to choose from and the potential of economic impact to a community so desirable, bringing film projects to an area can be very competitive.”

“We’re in the business of ‘repeat business,’” Vaught said, “so we want to make sure everything in the filming process is handled professionally.”

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